Grif.Net

04/06/17 Grif.Net – More Words to Increase your Vocabulary

04/06/17 Grif.Net – More Words to Increase your Vocabulary

8. POPPYCOCK. =
H
ave you ever =
listened to somebody trying to talk about something that they know =
absolutely nothing about? Like, you know that what they’re saying =
is completely untrue, yet they insist on continuing to talk? Not =
laughing! Poppycock has nothing to do with poppies (a type of =
flower) or cocks (a male bird) but from the Dutch word pappekak, =
which is made from pap (soft) and kak (poop!). It’s =
been part of English since the 1800’s.

“Hey, I =
heard that if you keep your eyes open when you sneeze your eyes will fly =
out. What a load of poppycock!”

 

9. =
DISCOMBOBULATE Since 1850 (m
ainly in USA) =
if somebody’s talking lots of gibberish, =
gobbledygook, and poppycock, they may be trying to =
discombobulate (verb) another person, meaning to =
confuse.

“What&#82=
17;s the matter? You look a little =
discombobulated!”

 

10. FLUMMOX. =
This 1850’s adjective means
to confuse =
them a lot. It was taken from dialects used in some parts of the =
UK.

“Her =
explanation seemed to flummox rather than enlighten the =
listener.”

 

11. =
CURMUDGEON. Another word used across England before Shakespeare, this =
one for
someone =
who’s very bad-tempered and grumpy.

“I =
don’t like our English teacher … he is a real =
curmudgeon!”

 

12. =
LACKADAISICAL. Since 1700 this was used to describe
someone who is =
lazy and has no enthusiasm or determination.

“My =
sister has no job and is doing nothing to find one. She is so =
lackadaisical.”

 

13. WOEBEGONE =
Break this
adjective in =
two from the Middle English and you get woe (extreme sadness) and =
begone (an old-fashioned word that means surrounded by =
something).
“Why do you look so =
woebegone?”

 

14. LOLLYGAG. =
N
othing to do =
with lollies or gags, it actually means to be idle and lazy or to waste =
time. It’s most common in the USA. It’s not unusual to hear =
parents shout to their children to “stop =
lollygagging”
– now you’ll know what they’re =
talking about! The word has been used since the 1800’s. Nobody =
really knows where it came from though.

 

~~

Dr Bob Griffin =

bob@grif.net www.grif.net =

"Jesus Knows Me, This I =
Love!"