02/28/13 Grif.Net – March Collections of Word Plays

[I know. A day early. But March 1-14 grif.net humor will celebrate aging,
culminating with the 65th birthday on March 14 if I live that long. LOTS of
jokes about getting old!!]

I read about car vandalism in the downtown 4-story parking garage. This just
seemed wrong on so many levels.

~~
I bet the butcher $50 that he couldn’t reach the meat off the top shelf. He
said, “No bet. The steaks are too high.”

~~
A man in Florida was arrested for drunk driving on a motorized shopping cart
at a Wal-Mart. He led cops on a chase that reached 90 aisles per hour.

~~
It cost 75 cents to put air in my tire at a gas station where it used to be
free. I asked the gal behind the counter why the cost for air went up to 75
cents. She said, ‘Inflation, I guess.’

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/27/13 Grif.Net – Visiting a Babdiss Church

[A friend in Arkansas sent these observations]

You might be visiting a Babdiss Church if . .

. . the Call to Worship is “Y’all come on in!”

. . people grumble about why Noah let them varmints on the Ark. (Some
substitute “Yankees” for “varmints”)

. . the Preacher says, “I’d like to ask Bubba to help take up the offering”
and five guys stand up.

. . opening day of deer hunting season is recognized as an official church
holiday.

. . a member requests to be buried in his four-wheel drive truck because, “I
ain’t never been in a hole it couldn’t get me out of”.

. . in the annual stewardship drive there is at least one pledge of “two
calves”.

. . the only time people lock their cars in the parking lot is during the
summer and then only so their neighbors can’t leave them a bag of squash.

. . there is no such thing as a “secret” sin.

. . finding and returning lost sheep is not just a parable.

. . high notes on the organ set dogs in the parking lot to howling.

. . people wonder when Jesus fed the 5,000 whether the two fish were bass
or catfish.

. . the final words of the benediction are, “Y’all come back now, ya hear!”

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/26/13 Grif.Net – Give It Up for Lent

[Some funny, some not. But all real quotations.]

“Next year at Lent I’m going to give up coming up with ideas for what my
wife should give up for Lent.” (unnamed friend of mine)

“For Lent, I’m giving up making jokes about what I’m giving up for Lent.”
(George Burns)

“This Lent, I’m giving up fantasizing about all the things I was going to
buy with the Christmas bonus I never got.” (FaceBook friend)

“I tried giving up self deprecation for Lent but changed my mind when I
realized I wasn’t very good at it.”

“Two weeks into Lent and I’ve still kept my pledge to give up bragging.”
(Tweet)

“Let’s give up our worst vices with the understanding that in about a month
we’ll indulge them with twice the fervor.” (unknown)

“A mother-in-law is always as welcome as the first day of Lent.” (Dutch
proverb)

As a Catholic, presidential candidate Newt Gingrich said he plans on giving
up desserts for Lent. His wife, Callista, confessed she’s giving up her
opinion.

“It is not repentance that saves me; repentance is the sign that I realize
what God has already done in Christ Jesus.” (Oswald Chambers)

And MY decision? “This year I’m giving up use of the past tense for Lend.”
(Bob Griffin)

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/25/13 Grif.Net – The Art of Error

THE ZEN OF COMPUTERS

In Japan, they have replaced the impersonal and unhelpful Microsoft Error
messages with Haiku poetry messages. Haiku poetry has strict construction
rules. Each poem has only three lines, 17 syllables: five syllables in the
first line, seven in the second, five in the third.

Haiku is used to communicate a timeless message, often achieving a wistful,
yearning and powerful insight through extreme brevity — the essence of Zen.
(Tried to credit author/contributor.)

Windows NT crashed.
I am the Blue Screen of Death.
No one hears your screams.
– Peter Rothman

Your file was so big.
It might be very useful.
But now it is gone.
– David J. Liszewski

The Website you seek
Cannot be located, but
Countless more exist.
– Joy Rothke

Chaos reigns within.
Reflect, repent, and reboot.
Order shall return.
– Suzie Wagner

ABORTED effort:
Close all that you have.
You ask way too much.
– Mike Hagler

Yesterday it worked.
Today it is not working.
Windows is like that.
– Margaret Segall

First snow, then silence.
This thousand dollar screen dies
so beautifully.
– Simon Firth

The Tao that is seen
Is not the true Tao, until
You bring fresh toner.
– Bill Torcaso

A crash reduces
your expensive computer
to a simple stone.
– James Lopez

Three things are certain:
Death, taxes and lost data.
Guess which has occurred.
– David Dixon

You step in the stream,
But the water has moved on.
This page is not here.
– Cass Whittington

I am the master.
You have nowhere to run to.
Microsoft can’t die.

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/23/13 Weekend Grif.Net – Law of the Garbage Truck

[CC in Houston forwarded these thoughts. No clue of origin.]

One day I hopped in a taxi and we took off for the airport. We were driving
in the right lane when suddenly a black car jumped out of a parking space
right in front of us. My taxi driver slammed on his brakes, skidded, and
missed the other car by just inches! The driver of the other car whipped his
head around and started yelling at us. My taxi driver just smiled and waved
at the guy. I mean, he was really friendly.

So I asked, ‘Hey, why did you just do that? This guy almost ruined your car
and sent us to the hospital!’ This is when my taxi driver taught me what I
now call the ‘Law of the Garbage Truck’:

He said, “You know, many people are like garbage trucks. They run around
full of garbage – full of frustration, full of anger, and full of
disappointment. As their garbage piles up, they need a place to dump it, so
sometimes they’ll dump it on you.”

His advice? “Don’t take it personally. Just smile, wave, wish them well, and
move on. Don’t pick up the garbage others are trying to get rid of. If you
do, you’ll take it with you and will end up dumping it on people around you,
at work, at home, or on the streets.”

“If you want to be happy, do not let garbage trucks – your own or other
people’s – overtake your day. Let go anything that’s not positive.”

“Life is ten percent what you make it and ninety percent how you take it!”

“Love the people who treat you right. Pray for the ones who don’t.”

Good advice.

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/22/13 Grif.Net – Old but still Funny

[Virginia contributed these jokes that her mother who is nearly 100 thought
were some of these funniest in her memory. I agree with her sense of
humor.]

“I’m a light eater. The minute it gets light, I start to eat.”

~~
“Why is 5:00 am like the tail of a pig?”
“It’s twirly.”

~~
“Definition of the height of confidence: Someone who stands up in a hammock”

~~
“Joe is a real forthright character. He’s right about 25% of the time”

~~
“Hey, would you like to hear a joke about the President?”
“Wait a minute – I want to let you know right away I work in the White
House.”
“Okay, I’ll tell it very slowly.”

~~
“How do you get down off an elephant?”
“You don’t. You get down off a duck.”

~~
“He says he’s a self-made man. Shows you how bad unskilled labor is these
days.”

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/21/13 Grif.Net – Cleaning Mirrors

We should learn from the Beaverton (OR) School District:

A principal of a small middle school had a problem with a few of the older
girls starting to use lipstick. When applying it in the bathroom they would
then press their lips to the mirror and leave lip prints.

Before it got out of hand he thought of a way to stop it. He gathered all
the girls together that wore lipstick and told them he wanted to meet with
them in he ladies room at 2 pm. They gathered at 2 pm and found the
principal and the school custodian waiting for them.

The principal explained that it was becoming a problem for the custodian to
clean the mirror every night. He said he felt the ladies did not fully
understand just how much of a problem it was and he wanted them to witness
just how hard it was to clean. The custodian then demonstrated. He took a
long brush on a handle out of a box.

He then dipped the brush in the nearest toilet, moved to the mirror and
proceeded to remove the lipstick. That was the last day the girls pressed
their lips on the mirror.

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/20/13 Grif.Net – Really Tough Day

[Mother-in-law told this story 40+ years ago. Still now, when asked how
things are going, some days the final lines of this story are fresh in my
mind.]

John went out golfing one fine day with his best friend George. On the
second tee George hit a beautiful 4-iron shot that hit the flag and bounced
into the cup. George had a heart attack on the spot and died.

Returning home, John shared the sad news with his wife. “It was really
difficult from that point on”, he told his wife. “All the rest of the day
it was hit the ball, drag George; hit the ball, drag George.”

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/19/13 Grif.Net – Reading Skills

[Key: Read each capitalized letter as the letter itself, not part of a word]

M R ducks
M R knot
O S A R
C M wangs
L I B, M R ducks

M R snakes
M R knot
O S A R
C M B D I’s
L I B, M R snakes

M R farmers
M R knot
O S A R
C M M T pockets
L I B, M R farmers

M R mice
M R knot
O S A R
C M E D B D feet
L I B, M R mice

(If you get the hang of it feel free to make up your own and submit them for
future grif.net fodder. And remember . . . )

I M 4 U, S I M, S I M, G I 1 2 B 4 U 4 F R N F R

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/18/13 Grif.Net – More Church Signs

In the Dark? Follow the Son.

Don’t Let Worry Kill You – Let the Church Help

Want a New Look for 2013? Come, Have your Faith Lifted

Running Low on Faith? Stop in for a Fill-up.

Fight Truth Decay – Read Your Bible

Trouble Sleeping? Come hear Pastor Bob’s Sermon

And the best?
Jesus Invested His Life for You. Have You Shown any Interest?

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/16/13 Weekend Grif.Net – 6 Seconds

[Forwarded to the Grif.Net by a friend who left his legs in Vietnam, who knows all about the character of our military. I am abridging the story in my sermon tomorrow - as Jesus gives us the order to "abide" in Him, to stand and never waver.]

On Nov 13, 2010, four days after his son, Lt Robert Kelly, USMC, was killed by an IED while on his 3rd Combat tour, Lt General John Kelly, USMC, gave a speech about the dedication and valor of our young men and women who step forward each and every day to protect us. During the speech, he never mentioned the loss of his own son, but spoke of the last six seconds in the lives of two young Marines who died with rifles blazing to protect their brother Marines.

“I will leave you with a story about the kind of people they are, about the quality of the steel in their backs, about the kind of dedication they bring to our country while they serve in uniform and forever after as veterans. Two years ago when I was the Commander of all U.S. and Iraqi forces, in fact, the 22nd of April 2008, two Marine infantry battalions, 1/9 “The Walking Dead,” and 2/8 were switching out in Ramadi. One battalion in the closing days of their deployment going home very soon, the other just starting its seven-month combat tour. Two Marines, Corporal Jonathan Yale and Lance Corporal Jordan Haerter, 22 and 20 years old respectively, one from each battalion, were assuming the watch together at the entrance gate of an outpost that contained a makeshift barracks housing 50 Marines. The same broken down ramshackle building was also home to 100 Iraqi police, also my men and our allies in the fight against the terrorists in Ramadi, a city until recently the most dangerous city on earth and owned by Al Qaeda.
Yale was a dirt poor mixed-race kid from Virginia with a wife and daughter, and a mother and sister who lived with him and whom he supported as well. He did this on a yearly salary of less than $23,000. Haerter, on the other hand, was a middle class white kid from Long Island. They were from two completely different worlds. Had they not joined the Marines they would never have met each other, or understood that multiple America’s exist simultaneously depending on one’s race, education level, economic status, and where you might have been born. But they were Marines, combat Marines, forged in the same crucible of Marine training, and because of this bond they were brothers as close, or closer, than if they were born of the same woman.

The mission orders they received from the sergeant squad leader I am sure went something like, “Okay you two clowns, stand this post and let no unauthorized personnel or vehicles pass. Our lives depend on you. You clear?” I am also sure Yale and Haerter then rolled their eyes and said in unison something like, “Yes Sergeant,” with just enough attitude that made the point without saying the words, “No kidding, sweetheart, we know what we’re doing.” They then relieved two other Marines on watch and took up their post at the entry control point of Joint Security Station Nasser, in the Sophia section of Ramadi, Al Anbar, Iraq.

A few minutes later a large blue truck turned down the alley way – perhaps 60-70 yards in length, and sped its way through the serpentine of concrete jersey walls. The truck stopped just short of where the two were posted and detonated, killing them both catastrophically. Twenty-four brick masonry houses were damaged or destroyed. A mosque 100 yards away collapsed. The truck’s engine came to rest two hundred yards away knocking most of a house down before it stopped. Our explosive experts reckoned the blast was made of 2,000 pounds of explosives. Two died, and because these two young infantrymen didn’t have it in their DNA to run from danger, they saved 150 of their Iraqi and American brothers-in-arms.

When I read the situation report about the incident a few hours after it happened I called the regimental commander for details as something about this struck me as different. Marines dying or being seriously wounded is commonplace in combat. We expect Marines regardless of rank or MOS to stand their ground and do their duty, and even die in the process, if that is what the mission takes. But this just seemed different. The regimental commander had just returned from the site and he agreed, but reported that there were no American witnesses to the event – just Iraqi police. I figured if there was any chance of finding out what actually happened and then to decorate the two Marines to acknowledge their bravery, I’d have to do it as a combat award that requires two eye-witnesses and we figured the bureaucrats back in Washington would never buy Iraqi statements. If it had any chance at all, it had to come under the signature of a general officer.

I traveled to Ramadi the next day and spoke individually to a half-dozen Iraqi police all of whom told the same story. The blue truck turned down into the alley and immediately sped up as it made its way through the serpentine. They all said, “We knew immediately what was going on as soon as the two Marines began firing.” The Iraqi police then related that some of them also fired, and then to a man, ran for safety just prior to the explosion. All survived. Many were injured, some seriously. One of the Iraqis elaborated and with tears welling up said, “They’d run like any normal man would to save his life.” “What he didn’t know until then,” he said, “And what he learned that very instant, was that Marines are not normal.” Choking past the emotion he said, “Sir, in the name of God no sane man would have stood there and done what they did.” “No sane man.” “They saved us all.”

What we didn’t know at the time, and only learned a couple of days later after I wrote a summary and submitted both Yale and Haerter for posthumous Navy Crosses, was that one of our security cameras, damaged initially in the blast, recorded some of the suicide attack. It happened exactly as the Iraqis had described it. It took exactly six seconds from when the truck entered the alley until it detonated.

You can watch the last six seconds of their young lives. Putting myself in their heads I supposed it took about a second for the two Marines to separately come to the same conclusion about what was going on once the truck came into their view at the far end of the alley. Exactly no time to talk it over, or call the sergeant to ask what they should do. Only enough time to take half an instant and think about what the sergeant told them to do only a few minutes before, “Let no unauthorized personnel or vehicles pass.” The two Marines had about five seconds left to live.

It took maybe another two seconds for them to present their weapons, take aim, and open up. By this time the truck was half-way through the barriers and gaining speed the whole time. Here, the recording shows a number of Iraqi police, some of whom had fired their AKs, now scattering like the normal and rational men they were – some running right past the Marines. They had three seconds left to live.

For about two seconds more, the recording shows the Marines’ weapons firing non-stop the truck’s windshield exploding into shards of glass as their rounds take it apart and tore in to the body of the ( I deleted) who is trying to get past them to kill their brothers – American and Iraqi-bedded down in the barracks totally unaware of the fact that their lives at that moment depended entirely on two Marines standing their ground.

If they had been aware, they would have known they were safe because two Marines stood between them and a crazed suicide bomber. The recording shows the truck careening to a stop immediately in front of the two Marines. In all of the instantaneous violence Yale and Haerter never hesitated. By all reports and by the recording, they never stepped back. They never even started to step aside. They never even shifted their weight. With their feet spread shoulder width apart, they leaned into the danger, firing as fast as they could work their weapons. They had only one second left to live.

The truck explodes. The camera goes blank. Two young men go to their God. Six seconds. Not enough time to think about their families, their country, their flag, or about their lives or their deaths, but more than enough time for two very brave young men to do their duty into eternity. That is the kind of people who are on watch all over the world tonight – for you.

We Marines believe that God gave America the greatest gift he could bestow to man while he lived on this earth – freedom. We also believe he gave us another gift nearly as precious – our soldiers, sailors, airmen, U S Customs and Border Patrol, Coast Guardsmen, and Marines – to safeguard that gift and guarantee no force on this earth can ever steal it away.”

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/16/13 Weekend Grif.Net – 6 Seconds

[Forwarded to the Grif.Net by a friend who left his legs in Vietnam, who knows all about the character of our military. I am abridging the story in my sermon tomorrow - as Jesus gives us the order to "abide" in Him, to stand and never waver.]

On Nov 13, 2010, four days after his son, Lt Robert Kelly, USMC, was killed by an IED while on his 3rd Combat tour, Lt General John Kelly, USMC, gave a speech about the dedication and valor of our young men and women who step forward each and every day to protect us. During the speech, he never mentioned the loss of his own son, but spoke of the last six seconds in the lives of two young Marines who died with rifles blazing to protect their brother Marines.

“I will leave you with a story about the kind of people they are, about the quality of the steel in their backs, about the kind of dedication they bring to our country while they serve in uniform and forever after as veterans. Two years ago when I was the Commander of all U.S. and Iraqi forces, in fact, the 22nd of April 2008, two Marine infantry battalions, 1/9 “The Walking Dead,” and 2/8 were switching out in Ramadi. One battalion in the closing days of their deployment going home very soon, the other just starting its seven-month combat tour. Two Marines, Corporal Jonathan Yale and Lance Corporal Jordan Haerter, 22 and 20 years old respectively, one from each battalion, were assuming the watch together at the entrance gate of an outpost that contained a makeshift barracks housing 50 Marines. The same broken down ramshackle building was also home to 100 Iraqi police, also my men and our allies in the fight against the terrorists in Ramadi, a city until recently the most dangerous city on earth and owned by Al Qaeda.
Yale was a dirt poor mixed-race kid from Virginia with a wife and daughter, and a mother and sister who lived with him and whom he supported as well. He did this on a yearly salary of less than $23,000. Haerter, on the other hand, was a middle class white kid from Long Island. They were from two completely different worlds. Had they not joined the Marines they would never have met each other, or understood that multiple America’s exist simultaneously depending on one’s race, education level, economic status, and where you might have been born. But they were Marines, combat Marines, forged in the same crucible of Marine training, and because of this bond they were brothers as close, or closer, than if they were born of the same woman.

The mission orders they received from the sergeant squad leader I am sure went something like, “Okay you two clowns, stand this post and let no unauthorized personnel or vehicles pass. Our lives depend on you. You clear?” I am also sure Yale and Haerter then rolled their eyes and said in unison something like, “Yes Sergeant,” with just enough attitude that made the point without saying the words, “No kidding, sweetheart, we know what we’re doing.” They then relieved two other Marines on watch and took up their post at the entry control point of Joint Security Station Nasser, in the Sophia section of Ramadi, Al Anbar, Iraq.

A few minutes later a large blue truck turned down the alley way – perhaps 60-70 yards in length, and sped its way through the serpentine of concrete jersey walls. The truck stopped just short of where the two were posted and detonated, killing them both catastrophically. Twenty-four brick masonry houses were damaged or destroyed. A mosque 100 yards away collapsed. The truck’s engine came to rest two hundred yards away knocking most of a house down before it stopped. Our explosive experts reckoned the blast was made of 2,000 pounds of explosives. Two died, and because these two young infantrymen didn’t have it in their DNA to run from danger, they saved 150 of their Iraqi and American brothers-in-arms.

When I read the situation report about the incident a few hours after it happened I called the regimental commander for details as something about this struck me as different. Marines dying or being seriously wounded is commonplace in combat. We expect Marines regardless of rank or MOS to stand their ground and do their duty, and even die in the process, if that is what the mission takes. But this just seemed different. The regimental commander had just returned from the site and he agreed, but reported that there were no American witnesses to the event – just Iraqi police. I figured if there was any chance of finding out what actually happened and then to decorate the two Marines to acknowledge their bravery, I’d have to do it as a combat award that requires two eye-witnesses and we figured the bureaucrats back in Washington would never buy Iraqi statements. If it had any chance at all, it had to come under the signature of a general officer.

I traveled to Ramadi the next day and spoke individually to a half-dozen Iraqi police all of whom told the same story. The blue truck turned down into the alley and immediately sped up as it made its way through the serpentine. They all said, “We knew immediately what was going on as soon as the two Marines began firing.” The Iraqi police then related that some of them also fired, and then to a man, ran for safety just prior to the explosion. All survived. Many were injured, some seriously. One of the Iraqis elaborated and with tears welling up said, “They’d run like any normal man would to save his life.” “What he didn’t know until then,” he said, “And what he learned that very instant, was that Marines are not normal.” Choking past the emotion he said, “Sir, in the name of God no sane man would have stood there and done what they did.” “No sane man.” “They saved us all.”

What we didn’t know at the time, and only learned a couple of days later after I wrote a summary and submitted both Yale and Haerter for posthumous Navy Crosses, was that one of our security cameras, damaged initially in the blast, recorded some of the suicide attack. It happened exactly as the Iraqis had described it. It took exactly six seconds from when the truck entered the alley until it detonated.

You can watch the last six seconds of their young lives. Putting myself in their heads I supposed it took about a second for the two Marines to separately come to the same conclusion about what was going on once the truck came into their view at the far end of the alley. Exactly no time to talk it over, or call the sergeant to ask what they should do. Only enough time to take half an instant and think about what the sergeant told them to do only a few minutes before, “Let no unauthorized personnel or vehicles pass.” The two Marines had about five seconds left to live.

It took maybe another two seconds for them to present their weapons, take aim, and open up. By this time the truck was half-way through the barriers and gaining speed the whole time. Here, the recording shows a number of Iraqi police, some of whom had fired their AKs, now scattering like the normal and rational men they were – some running right past the Marines. They had three seconds left to live.

For about two seconds more, the recording shows the Marines’ weapons firing non-stop the truck’s windshield exploding into shards of glass as their rounds take it apart and tore in to the body of the ( I deleted) who is trying to get past them to kill their brothers – American and Iraqi-bedded down in the barracks totally unaware of the fact that their lives at that moment depended entirely on two Marines standing their ground.

If they had been aware, they would have known they were safe because two Marines stood between them and a crazed suicide bomber. The recording shows the truck careening to a stop immediately in front of the two Marines. In all of the instantaneous violence Yale and Haerter never hesitated. By all reports and by the recording, they never stepped back. They never even started to step aside. They never even shifted their weight. With their feet spread shoulder width apart, they leaned into the danger, firing as fast as they could work their weapons. They had only one second left to live.

The truck explodes. The camera goes blank. Two young men go to their God. Six seconds. Not enough time to think about their families, their country, their flag, or about their lives or their deaths, but more than enough time for two very brave young men to do their duty into eternity. That is the kind of people who are on watch all over the world tonight – for you.

We Marines believe that God gave America the greatest gift he could bestow to man while he lived on this earth – freedom. We also believe he gave us another gift nearly as precious – our soldiers, sailors, airmen, U S Customs and Border Patrol, Coast Guardsmen, and Marines – to safeguard that gift and guarantee no force on this earth can ever steal it away.”

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”

02/15/13 Grif.Net – Composing Some Humor

C, E-flat, and G go into a bar. The bartender says, “Sorry, but we don’t
serve minors.” So E-flat leaves, and C and G have an open fifth between
them.

After a few drinks, the fifth is diminished, and G is out flat.

F comes in and tries to augment the situation, but is not sharp enough.

D comes in and heads for the bathroom, saying, “Excuse me; I’ll just be a
second.”

Then A comes in, but the bartender is not convinced that this relative of C
is not a minor.

Then the bartender notices B-flat hiding at the end of the bar and says,
“Get out! You’re the seventh minor I’ve found in this bar tonight.”

E-flat returns the next night in a three-piece suit with nicely shined
shoes. The bartender says, “You’re looking sharp tonight. Come on in, this
could be a major development.”

Sure enough, E-flat soon takes off his suit and everything else, and is au
natural. Eventually C sobers up and realizes in horror that he’s under a
rest.

C is brought to trial, found guilty of contributing to the diminution of a
minor, and is sentenced to 10 years of D.S. without Coda at an upscale
correctional facility.

~~
Dr Bob Griffin
bob@grif.net www.grif.net
“Jesus Knows Me, This I Love!”